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Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs?: America's Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929--1981 Libro EPUB, PDF

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Descarga gratuita de libros epub Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs?: America's Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929--1981
  • Libro de calificación:
    4.15 de 5 (322 votos)
  • Título Original: Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs?: America's Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929--1981
  • Autor del libro: Amy Sue Bix
  • ISBN: 978-0801862441
  • Idioma: ES
  • Páginas recuento:376
  • Realese fecha:1995-01-17
  • Descargar Formatos: iBOOKS, CHM, TORRENT, TXT, EPUB, ODF, PGD, MS WORD
  • Tamaño de Archivo: 14.15 Mb
  • Descargar: 3322
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Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs?: America's Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929--1981 por Amy Sue Bix Libro PDF, EPUB

Americans today often associate scientific and technological change with progress and personal well-being, yet underneath this confident assumptions lie serious questions. In this work, Amy Sue Bix locates the origins of this confusion in the Great Depression, when social and economic crisis forced many Americans to re-examine ideas about science, technology, and progress. Americans today often associate scientific and technological change with progress and personal well-being, yet underneath this confident assumptions lie serious questions. In this work, Amy Sue Bix locates the origins of this confusion in the Great Depression, when social and economic crisis forced many Americans to re-examine ideas about science, technology, and progress. Growing fear of technological unemployment - the idea that increasing mechanization displaced human workers - prompted widespread talk about the meaning of progress in the new Machine Age. In response, promoters of technology mounted a powerful public relations campaign: in advertising, writings, speeches and World Fair exhibits, company leaders and prominent scientists and engineers insisted that mechanization ultimately would ensure American happiness and national success.